Mistakes Trainers and Coaches Make 4-26-10

Stupid Exercises

(This is Part 3 of a series. In case you missed them, you can find Part I here and Part II here.)

In our ongoing series of mistakes that trainers and coaches make, one of my pet peeves is trainers/coaches who have no rationale for why they’re doing something.

In the Indy Seminar Series (as well as my upcoming Single-Leg Solution package), I talk about the need for rationale.  Quite simply, if you’re writing workouts for someone else (or even yourself), can you explain why you choose:

–       A specific exercise?

–       A specific set/rep scheme?

–       A specific time under tension?

–       A specific rest period?

It not, you need to ask yourself, “why am I doing this?”

I understand everyone is getting all Gary Vaynerchuk and “Crushing It” with YouTube videos everywhere, but far too often it leads to the black box effect of exercise selection.

Reach into the box, pick any random exercise, and throw it into your programming.  And as a general rule of thumb, the cooler it looks, the better!

Instead, you should have a rationale for everything you do within your programming.  If you can’t tell a client or athlete exactly why they are performing an exercise, or what you expect it to do for them, you need to seriously re-examine their programming.

Stay strong

MR

2 Comments

Leave Comment

  1. I think the funniest thing about balance ball and bosu ball squats is that most trainers don't realize those things have a weight limit, and that is a static weight limit. After seeing one guy blow out an exercise ball and land flat on his back while trying to "bounce" the 100 lb dumbbells up it always makes me cringe watching those exercises.

  2. Great post Mike. This seems like the simplest concept but it's one that I feel like should always be revisited by everyone regardless of experience. It's easy to get caught up in fads and new exercises out of interest and excitement but I feel like its necessary to reign back whenever I write programs and re-focus on every thing I'm programming asking who, what, why, when and how.
    Keep up the great blogging.
    Kevin

Leave a Reply


Back to All Posts